Bangladesh Elections – Your Questions Answered

Tomorrow Bangladesh holds its 5th national election. The main two parties are the Awami League (Leader Sheikh Hasina) and the Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP Leader Khaleda Zia). These elections have come under the media spotlight after the BNP and its allies have decided to boycott the election.

0,,17045158_303,00

What is the risk?

– The Awami League is expected to win by a huge majority as a result of the opposition’s boycott. This will certainly undermine the credibility of the election. Violence is also expected to be an issue tomorrow as political workers from the parties clash.

Why has the Bangladesh Nationalist Party decided not to take part?

– The country has previously held elections with a neutral caretaker government to ensure that the election process is fair. But, in this election, the Awami League have refused to create a neutral caretaker government. This is believed to undermine the fairness of the election.

Impact of the boycott

– 154 out of the 300 seats are uncontested, which means the Awami League would win without trying. However, it is believed that continued protest and violent clashes will result from the election.

bangladesh_election--621x414

The main people

– The leader of both the Awami league and the BNP have been rivals for the past two decades as power shifted between the two parties. This election is likely to increase this tension dramatically. The third party’s (JP) leader H M Ershad has declared that the JP will also not be participating in the election furthering the complications.

What other issues are there?

– Violence, unemployment and poverty is high and afety and wage levels are low, which is not being helped by political instability. It is reported by The Asia Foundation that 75% of voters would like a neutral caretaker government during the election, so it will be interesting to see whether voter turnout will be on the same level as previous elections.

World Political implications

– Countries including the USA and the UK have refused to send observers to Bangladesh. This has weakened relations geopolitical and dented Bangladesh’s global image.

The election

– In the previous election there was a 70% voter turnout, but this is expected to be much less tomorrow. Although in 2008 the results were announced within 24 hours, the announcement of tomorrow’s results will depend on how peacefully the election is carried out.

What are your views on the elections? Should the Awami League set up a neutral caretaker government to maintain the peace?

Thanks for reading and please do share,

Digestible Politics

 https://www.facebook.com/pages/Digestible-Politics/476112109093593?ref=hl

https://twitter.com/Digest_politics

http://www.youtube.com/user/DigestiblePolitics

Job Cuts In Greece

The Greek parliament is holding a vote today on a proposal which could lead to the unemployment of 15,000 state employees. The reason for the proposals is to help the country to reduce costs and receive more bailout money, but there have been a series of protests in opposition to the job cuts from trade unions (groups representing those who may lose their job). Adedy, the civil service trade confederation, and the private sector GSEE union called a demonstration outside parliament late on Sunday afternoon against “those politicians who are dismantling the public service and destroying the welfare state”.

greekjobcuts

If the law passes it would undermine the constitutional guarantee that the civil servants’ jobs would be for life. Although the sector has been very large since the 1980s it is argued that the dismissal of the workers would be against their constitutional rights. Those who have broken rules will be the first to be dismissed, but a lot of other workers are to be replaced by younger employees.

It is estimated that if the law goes ahead unemployment will rise further than the 27% it is currently at. The proposals are predicted to pass with a fairly comfortable conservative majority supporting Prime Minister Antonis Samaras.

Thanks for reading,

Digestible Politics

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Digestible-Politics/476112109093593?ref=hl

https://twitter.com/Digest_politics

https://www.youtube.com/user/DigestiblePolitics

Please Help Us If You Can – Thank You!

Digestible Politics is a blog with a big ambition to help you become more informed with politics and current affairs in an easy-to-understand format. In the short amount of time we have been running we have already had hundreds of comments, thousands of page views and likes.

We just hope that you appreciate and enjoy this blog as much as we do publishing it and if you get spare a penny, pound or dollar for us would be very kind – but, of course, you DO NOT have to! We have a long term ambition of publishing a weekly/monthly magazine on politics made easy, to help those, who, like me, desired to have access to simple politics and not the confusion we can often face with other news/political sources! So please do help us to fund this if you can. Also, please do tell us if you like the idea of having a ‘Digestible Politics Magazine’!

You can donate in US dollars or British pounds below or in the sidebar. Thank you.

US Dollars:

British Pounds:

Thank you in advance,

Digestible Politics 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Digestible-Politics/476112109093593?ref=tn_tnmn

https://twitter.com/Digest_politics

https://www.youtube.com/user/DigestiblePolitics