Youth PCC, Paris Brown, stands down

You may remember a few weeks ago we posted about the “World’s Youngest Member Of Parliament” which sparked a healthy debate on youth in politics. Today, the world’s first Police Commissioner (an elective representative to ensure effective policing) stood down as a result of offensive tweets which created widespread criticism.

Yesterday, she apologised for the series of tweets referring to drugs, “pikes” and “fags”, which she had written between the ages of 14 and 16. Kent police (who she was to start work with later this year) are investigating the situation.

paris-brown-090413

She took on the job with a desire to “represent the young people of Kent”, but her hopes were cut short by the need to apologise and reassure the public that she was “not racist or homophobic”

What are your view on having a teenager in a position of authority? Does this show that children and teenagers have no place in politics?

Thanks,

Digestible Politics

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2 comments on “Youth PCC, Paris Brown, stands down

  1. mytiturk says:

    Thanks for following my blog. I think the age of a Member of Parliament is not really an issue. More important to me: first past the post electoral systems. In Canada here we have a Prime Minister with a majority of seats generated by 35% of the vote who is all-powerful, contemptuous and environmentally destructive. Replacing some of his orcs with teenagers would be a huge step forward.

  2. croppie123 says:

    I think that although a lot of teenagers will have this problem in years to come, a lot of teenagers won’t. If you place a teen in an authoritive position, you may find that they mature very quickly, they sober up as they realise the seriousness of the situation.
    To say teenagers and children have no place in politics is ridiculous. If anything, they need to have greater roles in politics. I mean, children don’t really understand most of politics, but each generation of teenagers will become a generation of voters. If they do not understand the politics of their country and what each party stands for etc., what is point in them voting?

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